Tuesday, August 9, 2016

RULES TO THE TOASTMASTERS CHALLENGE

THE TOASMASTERS CHALLENGE AT THE #BABISHAI2016 POETRY FESTIVAL
THURSDAY 25 AUGUST 5:30PM AT MARIA’S PLACE NTINDA ENTRY FEE IS 5,000/-

The Toastmasters Challenge is an intellectual battle of words between Kampala Toastmasters and poets. Poets in Kampala have created a positive shift in the creative industry. Through their inventiveness, Kampala flourishes with rich verse. Kampala Toastmasters Club is part of an international organization that trains in public speaking and effective communication. They meet every last Tuesday and every second Friday of the month at Protea Hotel in Kampala.

Tom Jalio,astmasters challenge judge


Meet the contestants:-
Moderator: Phillip Matogo

Poets
1.       L-Ness  Lydia  (Kenya)
2.       Winnie Apio (Uganda)
3.       Fahima Kimbugwe  (Uganda)
4.       Mark Gordon Slam Poet (Uganda)
5.       Jordey Lonyo (Uganda)

Kampala Toastmasters
1.       Connie Nshemereirwe (Uganda)
2.       Abubakar Matanda (Uganda
3.       Davis Tashobya (Uganda)
4.       Stephano Kiyemba (Uganda)
5.       Paul Kavuma (Uganda)

Meet the Judges
Lekpele Nyamalon (Liberia)
Doreen Baingana (Uganda)
Tom Jalio (Kenya)





THE RULES TO THE GAME
ROUND ONE is a knock-out round where two toastmasters and two poets will leave
Each of the ten contestants has between 3-5 minutes to present their speech or poem on any topic of their choice. Their presentations will be timed and any piece below 2 and a half minutes or above 5 and a half minutes, will be immediately disqualified.

There will be time cards.
Green time card will flag at 3 minutes
Yellow time card will flag at 4 minutes
Red time card will flag at 5 minutes

Judging Criteria:
        I.            Relevance of message
      II.            Eloquence and Enunciation
    III.            Creativity
    IV.            Connection with audience
      V.            The oomph factor/originality

ROUND TWO is also a knock-out round where two toastmasters and two poets will also leave
In round two, each of the 6 contestants has between 3-5 minutes to present their speech or poem on any topic of their choice. This time they are permitted to use a prop of their choice to enhance their presentation. Their presentations will be timed and any piece below 2 and a half minutes or above 5 and a half minutes, will be immediately disqualified.
There will be time cards.
Green time card will flag at 3 minutes
Yellow time card will flag at 4 minutes
Red time card will flag at 5 minutes
Criteria:
        I.            Relevance of message
      II.            Eloquence and Enunciation
    III.            Appropriate and creative usage of prop
    IV.            Connection with audience
      V.            The oomph factor/originality
FINAL ROUND THREE is AUDIENCE SELECTION.
In round three, each of the 2 final contestants has between 3-5 minutes to present their speech or poem on any topic selected by the audience. This time the two finalists will leave the area while the audience selects a topic. The finalists will then pick a random number in a hat to decide who goes first. Their presentations must be based on the given topic chosen by the audience and they will have minimal time to prepare. They will be timed and any piece below 2 and a half minutes or above 5 and a half minutes, will be immediately disqualified.

There will be time cards.
Green time card will flag at 3 minutes
Yellow time card will flag at 4 minutes
Red time card will flag at 5 minutes

The audience will then select the winner.

The winner will receive a card to the award-giving  dinner on Friday 26 August at Fang Fang Restaurant and a book of their choice.
Our festival programme is available on our website www.babishainiwe.com and we can be reached via email at babishainiwe@babishainiwe.com.





Wednesday, August 3, 2016

THE #BABISHAI2016 POETRY SHORTLIST

And here we are with the #Babishai2016 Poetry shortlist. The shimmering of verse upon verse and conversations with trusted unknowns; the readers. This shortlist is their gift, an addition to the journey of those who have graciously embellished life with their own creativity.
Congratulations to each one. We’ll be holding a discussion on the shortlist at Femrite offices in Kampala  on Monday 22nd August from 5:30 pm. Please join us. Last year, Harriet Anena and Prof Rem Raj lead the same fiery discussion.

SHORTLIST:-

SINCERELY,
The Babishai Niwe Poetry Foundation Team
Vision: A Society immersed in poetry

Email address:    babishainiwe@babishainiwe.com
Tel:                         +256 751 703226
Website:               www.babishainiwe.com
Twitter:                @BNPoetryAward
The #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival runs from 24 to 26 August 2016  in Kampala Ntinda at Maria's Place opposite the Froebel stage, near Victory City Church.
Poetry Festival



Tuesday, August 2, 2016

ABIGAIL ARUNGA ASKS WHY EVERYONE IS AFRAID OF TALKING ABOUT SEX; #BABISHAI2016 GUEST

Abigail Arunga is a Kenyan poet who will one day write and make so much money that she’ll retire young and happy. She is the author of two extremely vivid and creative poetry collection namely; Akello (2014) and a side of raunch (2016). Abigail wonders why people still won’t talk about sex and we’re proud to host her at the #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival.


 Abigail, which people are those who have refused to talk about sex and why do you think that is?
EVERYONE. Our parents. Our friends. Our teachers. Our publishers. Our newspapers. Our politicians, unless it is to insult each others’ genitals, which honestly, doesn’t count. Why don’t they talk about it…because everyone has this obsession with looking holy. And everyone wants to look holy because sex, even a hint of it, is considered taboo, or only to be talked about by married people, and even then, only on the first night after asking hurried permission for entry.

In your session entitled, The place of sensuality in Contemporary Poetry, and why people still won’t talk about sex, would you consider it successful if more people included sex in their writing?
Well. Successful is not the word I would use. Maybe more, truthful. Because truthfully, or at least as Kenyans, sex is on our minds a lot. Sex sells. People buy it. People want it. People think about it, whether they are having it or not. And not in a pervy leery or rapey way for a large part, just in a healthy, we-are-humans-and-have-needs way.


Akello's books will be on sale at the Babishai Festival

You want to grow your dreadlocks as long as Maxi Priest’s. After that, what next for your hair?
I go around with dread envy for people whose dreads sashay all the way down to the swell of their arses. I love it. I am looking forward to mine being envied. And turning grey. And sashaying.

You will be part of a panel discussion on African feminism in poetry. A few African feminist poet who come to mind are Alice Walker (African American), Warsan Shire, Harriet Anena amongst others. What importance does African feminism play in your own poetry?
Simply because African feminism needs to be touted louder; my poetry, I think, offers a voice to that tone of sensuality that either has been stifled, or hasn’t been told, or hasn’t been said loudly and proudly, a lot of the time. People think some of my stuff is raunchy, and I am like…but you people, you give blowjobs, no? Just because I say it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. Don’t act like it doesn’t, hehe.

When you hear of Ugandan poetry, what comes to mind?
Harriet Anena, of course, and Peter Kagayi’s lastest collection, The Headline This Morning. And also a hidden sexuality that I haven’t yet seen broadcasted. Stereotypical though it may be (and stereotypes aren’t a bad thing sometimes, they happen because they have been proven a few times), I think Ugandans are a very sexually exciting people.
How important do you think it is to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Song of Lawino, by Okot ‘Bitek? (May he rest in peace)
It is important to celebrate what came before, what is here now, and what is coming. No pun intended.

How different were the writing processes for your two collections, Akello and A side of raunch?
A side of raunch took a much shorter time, and not just because it is shorter. Akello was younger and more unbridled. A side of raunch was scarier for me to announce. I am still hiding it from most of my relatives.

What do you expect at the #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival?
To enjoy myself; to have rousing literary discussions; to drink a bit; to love it.

We look forward  to seeing you soon.



Monday, July 25, 2016

LILLIAN AUJO, BABISHAI FESTIVAL GUEST AND PRIZE WINNER OF FICTION AND POETRY

Lillian Akampurira Aujo is a Ugandan writer and a member of Femrite. In 2009, she won the inaugural BN Award with the poem 'Soft Tonight'. In 2015, she won the inaugural Jalada Prize for Literature with her short story "Where pumpkin leaves dwell.” During the 
 During the #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival, she will Participate in a panel, "What are Ugandan women poets poeting about?"



Which one of your written poems do you constantly refer to and why?

1.      People ask me about ‘Soft tonight’, so I find that I keep referring to it a lot. 

 What is your relationship with poetry on the stage?
  Anyone who knows me will tell you that I am comfortable on the page, and really uneasy on stage. So my relationship with poetry on stage is pretty novice.  I might change that soon, because for long I have toyed with the idea of being a performance poet.

 At the #Babishai2016 poetry festival, you'll participate in a panel entitled, What are Ugandan poets 'poeting' about? so, what are Ugandan women 'poeting' about?

3.    Politics! And I am glad that people like Anena have found un ignorable ways of putting it in Ugandan’s faces; a title like ‘I bow for my boobs’ is really hard to ignore.

 How would you define a successful poetry festival?

4.    A successful poetry festival has to have a buzz. (Yeah to Babishai on that!). Good performers to draw a crowd. And by crowd I categorically exclude poets, and include the other public. Good organisation of events, so that there aren’t too many similar things going on at the same time; that way guests don’t feel like they’ll have to miss out on something to attend another event. Then it has to have attendance from the public; otherwise who is it for?

 How has academiia influenced poetry, in your opinion?

5.   Has it? In my opinion there’s no clear cut distinction between academia and poetry. Even poets who don’t have degrees in literature and English or MFAs tend to invariably teach themselves the rules of poetry. So the two ‘worlds’ tend to co-exist in poetry..


6.  Parting remarks? 
F
6.   Memes like ‘poetry is for the elite’ need to die like yesterday! All our local languages are rich in poetry, the hawker on the street peddling his wares does so poetically, the touts calling to passengers do so poetically. So we need to stop lambasting ‘poetry’ with ‘elite’.

  Thank you.

   The Babishai Festival programme is here.
 http://babishainiwe.com/2016/07/21/babishai2016-poetry-festival-programme/








Thursday, July 21, 2016

THE #BABISHAI2016 POETRY FESTIVAL PROGRAMME IS HERE

Dear Friends,

The #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival programme is here. Follow the link below.

#Babishai2016 Poetry Festival Programme

Contact festival@babishainiwe.com
or  +256 751 703226 for any inquiry.







Wednesday, July 20, 2016

DAVIS TASHOBYA URGES ALL POETS TO JOIN KAMPALA TOASTMASTERS

Davis Tashobya is  the immediate past President of  Kampala Toastmasters Club and a  public speaking trainer in Kampala. He will also be participating in the Toastmasters Challenge at the #Babishai2016 Poetry Festival on 25 August.


How long have you been a member of Kampala Toastmasters and what significant change has it made on your life?

I have been a Toastmaster since September 2010 when I moved to Nairobi.
When I moved back to Kampala permanently in 2014, together with a few other like-minded Toastmasters from clubs I knew in Kenya, we started Kampala Toastmasters.

Toastmasters  has taught me everything I know about communication and leadership and then some. I have been able to nurture and develop some very strong and meaningful networks and made lots of friends along the way.

When you think of Ugandan poetry,  what comes to mind?
Okot,P'Bitek. As a literature student, I drank from the fountain that is 'Songs of Lawino" It left an indelible mark on me and I must admit though I haven't been keen to read up more on the new stuff being churned out in Ugandan poetry, I enjoy poetry recitals and like the new crop of young poets like Jason Ntaro, Peter Kagayi, Aujo Lillian, to mention but a few.


The Babishai Poetry Festival is going to host the first Toastmasters challenge. A battle of words between poets and public speakers. As  a competitor,  how will you prepare for the challenge?

I will rehearse, rehearse and then rehearse. If I could, I would go on top of a mountain and prepare day and night while shouting into the wilderness because I know this won't be an easy challenge but I plan on giving those poets a run for their money.


 Do you feel that professionals in the work space need to interact more with poets?

Absolutely, if for nothing else at least some of the poet's creativity could rub off onto them. I think most professionals could benefit from a huge dose of creativity.

How important is an education that includes creative arts?

I think it is extremely vital. The study of  the creative arts inevitably gives birth to some of this world's most prized artefacts, books, paintings and even when applied in the sciences it can help put into perspective various phenomenon, 

Any parting remarks?
I think all poets should sign up to be Toastmasters. They fit the billing with astounding accuracy. 



 Thank you Davis.

The next Kampala Toastmasters Club meeting is on Tuesday 26 August at Protea Hotel from 6:00pm



Tuesday, July 19, 2016

DR. NSHEMEREIRWE, IN A WORD OFF WITH POETS AT THE BABISHAI FESTIVAL

Dr. Connie Nshemereirwe is a seasoned toastmaster, an educationist and scholar, challenging the status quo of the Ugandan education system. She will be participating in the Babishai Poetry festival Toastmasters challenge on 25 August at Maria's Place in Ntinda, in an intellectual battle of words.
CONNIE
Courtesy photo
How long have you been a member of Kampala Toastmasters and what significant change has it made on your life?
I have been a member of the Kampala Toastmasters Club since April 2015, and before that I was a member of the Twente Toastmasters In The Netherlands, which I joined in October 2012.
Toastmasters has made a great difference in my life. It has made me a much more confident speaker, more structured, and given me the tools to prepare for any public speaking engagement in a much more purposeful fashion.

  1. When you think of Ugandan poetry,  what comes to mind? 
You know, I don't know much about Ugandan Poetry! Someone recently reached a hand into my parents' bookshelf and produced a dusty book of poems written by Ugandans in the 1970s, and I hadn't known it was there until then (I'll provide a title when I remember). Beyond that, I can only think of the Babishai Poetry Foundation. A quick Google search also reminded me of Song of Lawino. And of late I have been exposed to some spoken word artists (who I think are fantastic!) But I don't really know much about poetry. Regrettably, I think.
The Babishai Poetry Festival is going to host the first Toastmasters challenge. A battle of words between poets and public speakers. As a competitor,  how will you prepare for the challenge? 
I will prepare as usual, only I will try to be even more creative than usual. I will use my body, my voice, my eyes, everything! I plan on speaking with more than just my words because I think those poets will be hard to beat! :-)
Do you feel that professionals in the work space need to interact more with poets? 
The little interaction that I have had with poets, especially the spoken word artists, and some of the poems I read in that dusty old book of poems, leads me to believe that we would all be better off with more poetry in our lives. Poetry helps one's brain and senses expand, poetry can carry some deep messages about society's evils but can also reveal the beauty in society. I really think that not being exposed to poetry is a big loss to anyone.
How important is an education that includes creative arts? 
I think it would be invaluable! Humans are such multifaceted beings, and education should seek to touch and polish each of those facets; further, I think we lose a lot of creative potential by not exposing all children to the creative arts, and that is a loss not only to them but to society
Any parting remarks? 
I'm really looking forward to the "word-off", if I'm honest! Somewhat apprehensive but up to the challenge! I think it s a great initiative,  good job! :-)

Thank you Connie
The Babishai Poetry Festival runs from 24-26 August at Maria's Place in Ntinda.
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